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LacCore
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College of Science & Engineering > Dept. of Earth Sciences > Limnological Research Center > LacCore

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Coring Devices

LacCore maintains an array of field equipment for sampling water and sediment in most environmental settings. The coring devices range from simple, lightweight dredges and samplers designed to recover only the uppermost sequences to a marine coring system adapted for portability and deployment in lakes. Complementing these sampling systems are a suite of vessels and platforms designed for use in a variety of situations. All of the systems described below are presently in the LacCore equipment pool and are available for rental by any qualified researcher.

A description of all coring systems (PDF, 1.23MB) is available in addition to the individual information below.

For more information, pricing or logistical details contact Kristina Brady, Anders Noren or Amy Myrbo.

Surface Coring

These devices are used for recovering the sediment-water interface and materials immediately below the surface. They are all single-drive corers—they cannot be used to take a second, deeper core at a location already sampled. All but the Griffith corer can be operated by a single person.

Shallow Lakes (0-30m water depth)

Mid-Depth Lakes (10-300m water depth)

These devices are used to reach the maximum sediment depth possible, given the particular constraints (water depth, sediment character, tube length) of each device. Unconsolidated materials near the sediment-water interface are typically disturbed, if recovered at all with these corers. With the exception of the Livingstone-type devices, these corers are all single- drive corers: they cannot be used for repeat-drive coring in the same hole. They can reach sediment depths only as long as their core tube. Resistant deposits such as desiccation/soil surfaces, coarse-grained materials (sand, gravel, tephras) thicker than ~10cm, and hardpans formed through precipitation of (e.g.) silica, iron oxides, or calcium carbonate effectively stop downward progress with these corers wherever they occur in the stratigraphy, except as noted.

Deep Lakes (Lake Drilling)